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Shed Roof Styles Uncovered: 17 Different Types of Roof For Shed

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When it comes to designing the perfect shed for your backyard, one of the most critical elements to consider is the type of roof you choose. Not only does the roof provide protection from the elements, but it also contributes significantly to your shed’s aesthetics, structural integrity, and functionality.

With so many styles, materials, and designs, it’s essential to find the perfect roof that protects your shed and also adds personality to your outdoor space. In this article, we’ll do an in-depth analysis of different types of shed roofs. And even share some insights on choosing the best option for your unique needs.

So whether you’re a seasoned shed owner looking to replace your existing roof or a newbie considering your first shed project, you’re in the right place!

Let’s dive in and explore the different shed roof styles!

Outline

17 Different Types of Roofs Styles for Shed

1. Gable Roof: The Classic and Timeless Choice

Gable roof, also known as a pitched or peaked roof, is characterized by two sloping roof panels that meet at the ridge, forming a simple and classic triangular shape. This timeless design has been used for centuries and remains popular for sheds and residential buildings alike.

Some of the key benefits of opting for a gable roof include its easy construction, efficient water drainage, and ample attic space for storage or insulation. Additionally, its classic and familiar appearance adds an air of charm and appeal to your shed.

Building a Gable Roof: Steps and Considerations

To construct a gable roof, determine your roof’s pitch or slope first. Next, gather the necessary materials, such as rafters, sheathing, and roofing materials. Install the ridge beam and rafters, followed by the sheathing, and finally, add the roofing material of your choice. When building a gable roof, ensure that you consider factors such as local building codes, adequate ventilation, and insulation.


Pros


Cons

  • Easy to build

  • Cost-effective

  • Efficient water and snow shedding

  • Versatile, suitable for various architectural styles

  • Not ideal for High Wind or Hurricane Prone Areas

  • Limited Design Variation

2. Hip Roof: A Stable and Sturdy Option

A hip roof features four sloping sides that meet at a central ridge, creating a stable and robust structure. This design is particularly popular for regions with heavy snowfall or high winds, as it allows for easy shedding of snow and increased resistance to wind.

The advantages of a hip roof include its sturdiness, stability, and resistance to weather-related damage. Moreover, its unique design adds a touch of sophistication to your shed’s appearance.

Building a Hip Roof: Tips and Guidelines

To build a hip roof, start by determining your roof’s desired pitch and size. Construct a frame with four hip rafters that meet at the ridge, and connect them to the shed’s corners using common rafters. Once the frame is in place, add sheathing and your chosen roofing material. Remember that hip roofs are more complex to build than gable roofs, so consider hiring a professional if you’re unsure about your construction skills.


Pros

Cons

  • Highly stable and resistant to wind

  • Efficient water and snow shedding

  • Aesthetically pleasing

  • Offers additional living or storage space

  • More complex to build

  • More expensive than gable roofs

3. Gambrel Roof: The Spacious Barn-Style Choice

The gambrel roof, often associated with traditional barns, features a double-sloped design with two distinct pitches on each side. The lower slope is steeper than the upper slope, creating additional interior space and a distinctive silhouette.

A gambrel roof offers lots of storage space, making it an ideal choice for those seeking extra room for their shed. Additionally, its unique and striking appearance adds character to your outdoor structure.

Building a Gambrel Roof: Tips and Guidelines

When constructing a gambrel roof, start by designing the roof trusses with the desired pitches. Next, install the trusses and sheathing, followed by the roofing material. Ensure that you reinforce the gambrel roof structure with gusset plates or other bracing methods to provide additional support and stability.


Pros

Cons

  • Offers additional living or storage space

  • Classic barn-style appearance

  • Relatively simple design compared to mansard roofs

  • Aesthetically pleasing, especially for traditional or country-style homes

  • Less resistant to high winds compared to hip roofs

  • More complex to build

  • Potential for increased maintenance

4. Saltbox Roof: The Asymmetrical and Practical Design

A saltbox roof features an asymmetrical design, with one side sloping more steeply than the other. This distinct roof style originated in colonial New England and is popular for sheds and residential buildings.

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Saltbox roofs offer a unique aesthetic appeal and increased storage space due to their asymmetrical design. They also provide excellent water drainage and are well-suited for areas with heavy snowfall.

Building a Saltbox Roof: Tips and Guidelines

To build a saltbox roof, determine the desired pitches for each side of the roof first. Construct a frame with rafters and a ridge beam, then install sheathing and your chosen roofing material. Make sure to account for proper ventilation and insulation during the construction process.

Pros


Cons

  • Asymmetrical design

  • Efficient water runoff

  • Unique appearance

  • More complex to build

  • Limited design variation

5. Skillion Roof: The Modern and Minimalist Choice

A skillion roof, also known as a shed roof or lean-to roof, consists of a single sloping surface that extends from one side of the structure to the other. This modern, minimalist design is increasingly popular for contemporary sheds and tiny homes.

Skillion roofs are easy to construct, cost-effective, and offer excellent water drainage. Their sleek, angular design also adds a contemporary touch to your shed’s appearance.

Building a Skillion Roof: Steps and Considerations

Constructing a skillion roof requires determining the desired pitch and gathering the necessary materials. Once you’ve built the frame with rafters and a ridge beam, add sheathing and your chosen roofing material. Consider factors such as insulation, ventilation, and local building codes during construction.


Pros

Cons

  • Simple and cost-effective construction

  • Modern and minimalist appearance

  • Effective water runoff due to steep pitch

  • Limited attic or loft space

  • Not ideal for areas with heavy snowfall

  • Potential for wind uplift if not properly secured

 6. Sawtooth Roof: An Architectural Statement

A sawtooth roof features a series of sloping, parallel surfaces with alternating vertical and horizontal pitches. This striking design resembles the teeth of a saw and is often used in industrial buildings and modern architecture.

Sawtooth roofs offer ample natural light, ventilation, and a unique architectural statement. Additionally, they provide an opportunity for rainwater harvesting, making them an eco-friendly option.

Building a Sawtooth Roof: Steps and Considerations

To build a sawtooth roof, begin by designing the roof structure with alternating pitches. Install the rafters, sheathing, and roofing material, ensuring that you account for proper insulation and ventilation. Due to the complex nature of sawtooth roofs, you may want to consider hiring a professional to assist with construction.


Pros


Cons

  • Unique, modern design

  • Excellent natural light and ventilation

  • Suitable for solar panel installation

  • More expensive than traditional roof types

  • Complex design requires skilled labor

  • Higher construction and maintenance costs

7. Pyramid Roof: The Aesthetically Pleasing and Sturdy Option

A pyramid roof is a type of hip roof where all four sides slope up to meet at a single central point. This design creates a pyramid-like shape, hence its name.

Pyramid roofs are visually appealing, sturdy, and highly resistant to wind and other weather-related damage. Their symmetrical design also lends an air of elegance to your shed.

Building a Pyramid Roof: Tips and Guidelines

Constructing a pyramid roof requires a similar process to building a hip roof, with the key difference being that all four sides slope up to meet at a central point. Ensure proper ventilation and insulation, and consider hiring a professional if you’re unsure about your construction skills.

Pros


Cons

  • Aesthetically pleasing

  • Sturdy and resistant to high winds

  • Low maintenance

  • Complex construction

  • Higher construction cost

8. Curved Roof: The Sleek and Modern Choice

A curved roof features a gently arching design ranging from a subtle curve to a more pronounced, semi-circular shape. This sleek and modern roof style is an eye-catching addition to contemporary sheds and buildings.

Curved roofs offer a visually striking appearance, excellent water drainage, and the potential for increased interior space, depending on the curvature. Their unique design also sets them apart from traditional shed roofing styles.

Building a Curved Roof: Tips and Guidelines

To construct a curved roof, begin by designing the roof structure with the desired curve. This may require the use of custom-made trusses or laminated beams. Install the rafters, sheathing, and roofing material, ensuring that you account for proper insulation and ventilation. Due to the specialized nature of curved roofs, consider hiring a professional to assist with construction.

Pros


Cons

  • Sleek and modern appearance

  • Efficient water and snow shedding

  • Unique design

  • Custom construction and materials

  • Higher construction cost

  • Limited material options

9. Flat Roof: The Simple and Cost-effective Option

As the name suggests, a flat roof is a horizontal or nearly horizontal surface with a very slight pitch, typically no more than 10 degrees. This simple design is a popular choice for sheds and commercial buildings.

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Flat roofs are easy to construct, cost-effective, and offer additional space for rooftop installations or green roofs. They also provide a sleek, modern aesthetic that complements contemporary architecture.

Building a Flat Roof: Steps and Considerations

To build a flat roof, create a frame with joists and a slight pitch to facilitate water drainage. Install the sheathing, followed by a waterproof membrane or roofing material specifically designed for flat roofs. Ensure proper insulation and ventilation to avoid issues with condensation and thermal performance.


Pros


Cons

  • Simple construction

  • Cost-effective

  • Extra usable space on top

  • Suitable for modern or minimalist architectural styles

  • Increased risk of leaks and water damage

  • Limited lifespan compared to other roof types

  • Higher maintenance

10. Dutch Gable Roof: A Blend of Gable and Hip Designs

A Dutch gable roof, also known as a gablet roof, combines elements of both gable and hip roof designs. The lower portion of the roof resembles a hip roof, while the upper portion features a small gable, creating an interesting and attractive profile.

Dutch gable roofs offer the aesthetic appeal of a gable roof with the added stability and weather resistance of a hip roof. This hybrid design also provides additional storage or attic space.

Building a Dutch Gable Roof: Steps and Considerations

Constructing a Dutch gable roof involves building a hip roof with an additional gable structure at the ridge. Begin by constructing the hip roof frame, and then add the gable structure. Install sheathing and your chosen roofing material, ensuring proper ventilation and insulation.

Pros


Cons

  • Blend of gable and hip designs

  • Increased attic space compared to traditional hip roofs

  • Improved ventilation

  • More complex to build

  • Limited material options

  • Increased construction cost

11. Jerkinhead Roof: The Best of Gable and Hip Roofs

A jerkinhead roof, also known as a clipped gable or half-hip roof, features a gable roof design with the peaks “clipped” or truncated, resulting in a partial hip structure. This hybrid design offers a blend of gable and hip roof characteristics.

Jerkinhead roofs provide enhanced stability and wind resistance compared to traditional gable roofs, while still maintaining the aesthetic appeal and charm of a peaked roof design. They also offer improved water drainage and additional storage space.

Building a Jerkinhead Roof: Steps and Considerations

To build a jerkinhead roof, begin by constructing a gable roof frame with truncated or “clipped” peaks. Install the hip rafters at the clipped ends, followed by sheathing and your chosen roofing material. Ensure proper ventilation and insulation during the construction process.


Pros


Cons

  • Best of gable and hip roofs

  • Increased stability compared to traditional gable roofs

  • Unique, hybrid design

  • Complex design requires skilled labor

  • More expensive than traditional gable roofs

12. Dormer: Adding Style and Functionality

A dormer is a small, roofed structure that projects from the slope of a main roof, often containing a window. Dormers can be incorporated into various roof styles, adding architectural interest and providing additional natural light and ventilation to your shed’s interior.

Dormers offer several benefits, including increased natural light, improved ventilation, enhanced visual appeal, and the potential for additional usable space in your shed. They can also add an element of uniqueness and charm to your shed’s design.

Building a Dormer: Tips and Guidelines

When constructing a dormer, consider factors such as the size, style, and placement of the dormer, as well as the compatibility with your shed’s existing roof structure. Consult with a professional to ensure proper design, installation, and integration with your shed’s roof.

Pros


Cons

  • Additional natural light and ventilation

  • Enhances visual appeal

  • Increased interior space

  • Increases construction complexity

  • Potential for increased maintenance

13. Bonnet Style Roof: The Elegant and Practical Choice

A bonnet style roof, also known as a kicked-eaves roof, features a double slope on each side, with the lower slope having a gentler pitch than the upper one. This design creates an extended overhang, providing additional protection from the elements.

Bonnet style roofs offer several benefits, such as enhanced weather protection, improved curb appeal, and increased ventilation. The extended overhang can also create a shaded outdoor area or additional storage space beneath.

Building a Bonnet Roof: Tips and Guidelines

When constructing a bonnet style roof, consider factors such as the pitch, materials, and integration with your shed’s design. Ensure proper installation and support for the extended overhang, and consult with a professional if necessary.

14. Mansard Shed Roof Design: The Sophisticated and Spacious Option

A mansard shed roof, inspired by French architecture, features a double slope on each side, with the lower slope being steeper than the upper one. This design creates the appearance of a flattened top and allows for additional interior space, making it a practical and visually appealing option.

Mansard shed roofs offer several benefits, including increased interior space, elegant aesthetics, and the potential for additional storage or living areas. They can also provide improved insulation and energy efficiency due to the added roof volume.

Building a Mansard Shed Roof: Tips and Guidelines

When constructing a mansard shed roof, consider factors such as the pitch, materials, and integration with your shed’s design. Ensure proper support for the roof structure and consult with a professional if necessary.


Pros

Cons

  • Extra living or storage space

  • Classic French-inspired design

  • Versatility in design

  • Complex construction

  • Higher construction and maintenance costs

  • Not ideal for heavy snowfall areas

15. Butterfly Style Roof: The Contemporary and Eco-friendly Choice

A butterfly style roof features two roof surfaces that slope downward towards the center, creating a V-shape. This unique design allows for efficient water collection and promotes a modern, minimalist aesthetic.

Butterfly-style roofs offer several benefits, including improved water collection, a contemporary appearance, and the potential for increased natural light and ventilation. They can also be eco-friendly, particularly when combined with green roof features or solar panels.

Building a Butterfly Roof: Steps and Considerations

When constructing a butterfly-style roof, consider factors such as the pitch, materials, drainage, and integration with your shed’s design. Ensure proper support and waterproofing for the roof structure, and consult with a professional if necessary.


Pros

Cons

  • Modern and visually striking

  • Efficient water collection

  • Allows for large windows and natural light

  • Complex construction

  • Higher construction cost

  • Requires custom materials and design

16. Pent Roof: The Simple and Efficient Choice

A pent roof is a single-slope roof that typically extends from a higher wall to a lower one, creating a simple, clean, and efficient design. Pent roofs are popular for sheds and other small structures due to their ease of construction and low-maintenance requirements.

Pent roofs offer several benefits, including simplicity, cost-effectiveness, and efficient water runoff. They can also provide a modern, minimalist appearance and are well-suited for small sheds or structures with limited space.

Building a Pent Roof: Steps and Considerations

When constructing a pent roof, consider factors such as the slope, materials, and integration with your shed’s design. Ensure proper support and waterproofing for the roof structure and consult with a professional if necessary. Additionally, consider incorporating features such as overhangs or gutter systems for improved weather protection and water management.


Pros

Cons

  • Simple construction

  • Cost-effective

  • Efficient water runoff

  • Limited design variation

  • Not ideal for areas with heavy snowfall

  • Limited headroom in some designs

17. Green Roof: A Sustainable and Eco-friendly Option

A green roof, also known as a living roof, is a roof surface that supports vegetation and soil, creating a natural, sustainable environment atop a building or shed. Green roofs can range from simple, low-maintenance installations to more elaborate rooftop gardens.

Green roofs offer numerous benefits, including improved thermal performance, reduced stormwater runoff, enhanced air quality, and increased biodiversity. They also provide a visually appealing, natural aesthetic that can improve your shed’s overall appearance.

Building a Green Roof: Steps and Considerations

To build a green roof, start by ensuring that your shed’s structure can support the additional weight of soil and vegetation. Install a waterproof membrane, followed by a root barrier, drainage layer, and filter fabric. Add a layer of growing medium and plant your chosen vegetation. Make sure to plan for regular maintenance, including watering and weeding, to keep your green roof healthy and thriving.


Pros

Cons

  • Sustainable and eco-friendly

  • Reduces energy costs

  • Provides natural insulation

  • Complex construction and maintenance

  • Higher initial cost

  • Requires strong structural support

From the classic appeal of dormer roofs to the contemporary aesthetics of butterfly roofs, there is a design to suit every preference and needs. Carefully consider each option’s unique advantages and challenges to make the best choice for your shed’s roof.

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